Security Port

Security Forums
Security Articles
Security Port Blog
Security Blogs
Security Books
Security Glossary
Security Definitions
Security Directories
Security Wikis
Security Tradeshows
Security Newsletters
Security Alerts
Buyers Guides
Security Newsgroups
Security Organizations
Submit Security Sites
Security Magazines
Security Feeds
Security News
Security Software
Security Products
Search Databases


Security Port
Contains relevant information that pertains to security related issues and solutions.

Security Port

Internet Security Books
Books related to Internet security and online security.


Hacking: The Art of Exploitation

Hacking: The Art of Exploitation
No description


Stealing the Network: How to Own the Box

Stealing the Network: How to Own the Box
Stealing the Network is a book of science fiction. It's a series of short stories about characters who gain unauthorized access to equipment and information, or deny use of those resources to the people who are meant to have access to them. The characters, though sometimes well described, are not the stars of these stories. That honor belongs to the tools that the black-hat hackers use in their attacks, and also to the defensive measures arrayed against them by the hapless sysadmins who, in this volume, always lose. Consider this book, with its plentiful detail, the answer to every pretty but functionally half-baked user interface ever shown in a feature film.

One can read this book for entertainment, though its writing falls well short of cyberpunk classics like Burning Chrome and Snow Crash. Its value is in its explicit references to current technologies--Cisco routers, OpenSSH, Windows 2000--and specific techniques for hacking them (the heroes and heroines of this book are always generous with command-history dumps). The specific detail may open your eyes to weaknesses in your own systems (or give you some ideas for, ahem, looking around on the network). Alternately, you can just enjoy the extra realism that the detail adds to these stories of packetized adventure. --David Wall


Microsoft Internet Security and Acceleration (ISA) Server 2004 Unleashed (Unleashed)

Microsoft Internet Security and Acceleration (ISA) Server 2004 Unleashed (Unleashed)
No description


Web Security, Privacy and Commerce, 2nd Edition

Web Security, Privacy and Commerce, 2nd Edition
No description


Internet Forensics

Internet Forensics
No description


Firewalls and VPNs : Principles and Practices (Security)

Firewalls and VPNs : Principles and Practices (Security)
No description


Testing Web Security: Assessing the Security of Web Sites and Applications

Testing Web Security: Assessing the Security of Web Sites and Applications
No description


Voice over Internet Protocol (VoIP) Security

Voice over Internet Protocol (VoIP) Security
No description


Internet Denial of Service : Attack and Defense Mechanisms (Radia Perlman Computer Networking and Security)

Internet Denial of Service : Attack and Defense Mechanisms (Radia Perlman Computer Networking and Security)
No description


Virtual Private Networks for Dummies

Virtual Private Networks for Dummies
Shockingly short on implementation details, Virtual Private Networks for Dummies tries to craft a scattershot collection of facts and references into an introduction to virtual private networks (VPNs). That's not to say that this book is insubstantial, because it's not; probably, you'll learn something about networking, cryptography, authentication infrastructures, and other aspects of VPN engineering. Also, it's done a good job of compiling references to VPN resources on the Internet, so you'll have plenty of surfing to do. But it never explains how to build a VPN--or even the simplest laboratory simulation of one--and that's precisely the kind of how-to information that buyers of this book will want.

True enough: every situation that calls for a VPN is different; and, if the book had shown how to implement a VPN with one turnkey solution, users of the others would complain. But even the narrowest example would have been better than some of the stuff that fills these pages. At one point, the reader is walked through the process of encoding and decoding a plain-text message--by hand--by using a shared private key. Spare us, please. The book gives the vital Layer 2 Transport Protocol all of two short paragraphs. Sections on public-key encryption and digital certificates do a good job of unraveling perennially misunderstood processes, but they don't offset the lack of details on VPN. --David Wall

Topics covered: Aspects of virtual private networks (VPNs), organized to get potential VPN implementers thinking about security and other design issues. Specifically, Public-Key Infrastructure (PKI); digital certificates; turnkey VPN packages; and a lot of general stuff about what VPNs are good for, and how to design a good one.


Internet & Intranet Security

Internet & Intranet Security
No description


Norton Internet Security For Dummies

Norton Internet Security For Dummies
No description



Security Alerts
Locate security alerts, and security feeds via a security rss feed directory.