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Security Port
Contains relevant information that pertains to security related issues and solutions.

Security Port

Security Books
Books related to national security


Introduction to Homeland Security (Butterworth Heinemann Homeland Security)

Introduction to Homeland Security (Butterworth Heinemann Homeland Security)
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The 9/11 Commission Report: Final Report of the National Commission on Terrorist Attacks Upon the United States (Authorized Edition)

The 9/11 Commission Report: Final Report of the National Commission on Terrorist Attacks Upon the United States (Authorized Edition)
The result of months of intensive investigations and inquiries by a specially appointed bipartisan panel, The 9/11 Commission Report is one of the most important historical documents of the modern era. And while that fact alone makes it worth owning, it is also a chilling and valuable piece of nonfiction: a comprehensive and alarming look at one of the biggest intelligence failures in history and the events that led up to it. The commission traces the roots of al-Qaeda's strategies along with the emergence of the 19 hijackers and how they entered the United States and boarded airplanes. It details the missed opportunities of law enforcement officials to avert disaster. Using transcripts of cockpit voice recordings, the report describes events on board the planes along with the chaotic reaction on the ground from nearly every level of government. Going forward, the commission calls for a comprehensive overhaul of what it sees as a deeply flawed and disjointed intelligence-gathering operation. The creation of a post for a single National Security Director is recommended, along with the creation of a National Counterterrorism Center. The report finds fault with the approaches of both the Clinton and Bush administrations but, because they were a bipartisan panel and the problems described are so systemic and far-reaching, they stop short of assigning blame to any particular person or group. Credit must be given to how readable the report is. At more than 500 pages, the writing is clear and forceful and the information is made more accessible since it is fre from election politics and rancor. While the commission notes that future attacks are probably inevitable, a coordinated preventive effort along with a clear plan to respond with efficiency can offer Americans some hope in a post-9/11 world. --John Moe


Information Warfare & Security

Information Warfare & Security
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Body of Secrets : Anatomy of the Ultra-Secret National Security Agency

Body of Secrets : Anatomy of the Ultra-Secret National Security Agency
Everybody knows about the CIA--the cloak-and-dagger branch of the U.S. government. Many fewer are familiar with the National Security Agency, even though it has been more important to American espionage in recent years than its better-known counterpart. The NSA is responsible for much of the intelligence gathering done via technology such as satellites and the Internet. Its home office in Maryland "contains what is probably the largest body of secrets ever created."

Little was known about the agency's confidential culture until veteran journalist James Bamford blew the lid off in 1982 with his bestseller The Puzzle Palace. Still, much remained in the shadows. In Body of Secrets, Bamford throws much more light on his subject--and he reveals loads of shocking information. The story of the U-2 crisis in 1960 is well known, including President Eisenhower's decision to tell a fib to the public in order to protect a national-security secret. Bamford takes the story a disturbing step forward, showing how Eisenhower "went so far as to order his Cabinet officers to hide his involvement in the scandal even while under oath. At least one Cabinet member directly lied to the committee, a fact known to Eisenhower." Even more worrisome is another revelation, from the Kennedy years: "The Joint Chiefs of Staff drew up and approved plans for what may be the most corrupt plan ever created by the U.S. government. In the name of anticommunism, they proposed launching a secret and bloody war of terrorism against their own country in order to trick the American public into supporting an ill-conceived war they intended to launch against Cuba."

Body of Secrets is an incredible piece of journalism, and it paints a deeply troubling portrait of an agency about which the public knows next to nothing. Fans of The Sword and the Shield will want to read it, as will anybody who is intrigued by conspiracies and real-life spy stories. --John J. Miller


The Puzzle Palace : Inside America's Most Secret Intelligence Organization

The Puzzle Palace : Inside America's Most Secret Intelligence Organization
In 1947, the governments of the United States, the United Kingdom, Canada, Australia, and New Zealand signed a secret treaty in which they agreed to cooperate in matters of signals intelligence. In effect, the governments agreed to pool their geographic and technological assets in order to listen in on the electronic communications of China, the Soviet Union, and other Cold War bad guys--all in the interest of truth, justice, and the American Way, naturally. The thing is, the system apparently catches everything. Government security services, led by the U.S. National Security Agency, screen a large part (and perhaps all) of the voice and data traffic that flows over the global communications network. Fifty years later, the European Union is investigating possible violations of its citizens' privacy rights by the NSA, and the Electronic Privacy Information Center, a public advocacy group, has filed suit against the NSA, alleging that the organization has illegally spied on U.S. citizens.

Being a super-secret spy agency and all, it's tough to get a handle on what's really going on at the NSA. However, James Bamford has done great work in documenting the agency's origins and Cold War exploits in The Puzzle Palace. Beginning with the earliest days of cryptography (code-making and code-breaking are large parts of the NSA's mission), Bamford explains how the agency's predecessors helped win World War II by breaking the German Enigma machine and defeating the Japanese Purple cipher. He also documents signals intelligence technology, ranging from the usual collection of spy satellites to a great big antenna in the West Virginia woods that listened to radio signals as they bounced back from the surface of the moon.

Bamford backs his serious historical and technical material (this is a carefully researched work of nonfiction) with warnings about how easily the NSA's technology could work against the democracies of the world. Bamford quotes U.S. Senator Frank Church: "If this government ever became a tyranny ... the technological capacity that the intelligence community has given the government could enable it to impose total tyranny, and there would be no way to fight back, because the most careful effort to combine together in resistance to the government ... is within the reach of the government to know." This is scary stuff. --David Wall


Resurgence of the Warfare State : The Crisis Since 9/11

Resurgence of the Warfare State : The Crisis Since 9/11
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The Politics of the Presidency (Politics of the Presidency)

The Politics of the Presidency (Politics of the Presidency)
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The Nuclear Tipping Point: Why States Reconsider Their Nuclear Choices

The Nuclear Tipping Point: Why States Reconsider Their Nuclear Choices
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Defending the Homeland : Domestic Intelligence, Law Enforcement, and Security (Contemporary Issues in Crime and Justice Series.)

Defending the Homeland : Domestic Intelligence, Law Enforcement, and Security (Contemporary Issues in Crime and Justice Series.)
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Strategies of Containment : A Critical Appraisal of American National Security Policy during the Cold War

Strategies of Containment : A Critical Appraisal of American National Security Policy during the Cold War
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The 9/11 Commission Report: Omissions And Distortions

The 9/11 Commission Report: Omissions And Distortions
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National Security for a New Era : Globalization and Geopolitics

National Security for a New Era : Globalization and Geopolitics
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System Under Stress: Homeland Security and American Politics (Public Affairs and Policy Administration Series)

System Under Stress: Homeland Security and American Politics (Public Affairs and Policy Administration Series)
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Homeland Security Assessment Manual: A Comprehensive Organizational Assessment Based On Baldridge Criteria

Homeland Security Assessment Manual: A Comprehensive Organizational Assessment Based On Baldridge Criteria
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The Week The World Stood Still: Inside The Secret Cuban Missile Crisis (Stanford Nuclear Age Series)

The Week The World Stood Still: Inside The Secret Cuban Missile Crisis (Stanford Nuclear Age Series)
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Foreign Relations and National Security Law: Cases, Materials and Simulations (American Casebook Series)

Foreign Relations and National Security Law: Cases, Materials and Simulations (American Casebook Series)
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Civil Liberties Vs. National Security In A Post 9/11 World (Contemporary Issues)

Civil Liberties Vs. National Security In A Post 9/11 World (Contemporary Issues)
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